Friday, November 2, 2012

What Was Impossible

Here's the main thing.

Whenever you find yourself considering something that is completely impossible, remember this: you're completely (i.e. 100%) wrong. 

That's it. It all starts with the knowledge that every fiber of your being that screams, "No way! I could never do that!" is wrong. Your intuition, your gut, your violated sensibilities, they're all W-R-O-N-G, wrong. 

You feel overwhelmed. Wrong. Well, not exactly. Your feelings are your feelings. However, were you to get over the feelings of being overwhelmed, you'd realize that there's nothing about which to be overwhelmed. You're not overwhelmed; you just feel that way, and your feelings are W-R-O-N-G, wrong.

So that's the main thing. The second thing is: whenever you find yourself considering something that is completely impossible, remember this: you don't have to do it all at once.

One of the side effects of feeling something is impossible or feeling overwhelmed is deciding to "just get it over with." This approach is, you guessed it, W-R-O-N-G, wrong.  The key to doing the impossible is to break down the impossible into nice only-slightly-overwhelming steps and to pursue them one at a time. If a step is too overwhelming, then you break it down again.

Deciding to do it all at once is a surefire way to prove that all your wrong intuitions and sensibilities were right (which of course they weren't). You point your snowboard straight down the bunny slope. You lean forward, close your eyes and yell, "Geronimo!" You slide forward straight down the hill gaining speed and momentum, opening your eyes just before you plow into the class of beginners congregated at the bottom. You come to in the ambulance and remind yourself, "I knew I couldn't snowboard!"

W-R-O-N-G, wrong.

Yup. Even when you momentarily defy your sensibilities, everything inside you may still seek to prove them right. This brings us to the third thing. Whenever you find yourself considering something that is completely impossible, remember this: 1) you're completely wrong, 2) you don't have to do it all at once (break it into steps), and 3) keep trying. 

Sure, you'll fail. If you're at all persistent, you'll fail frequently. Nonetheless, with each failure comes insight and learning (if you're open to them and don't see failure as a bad thing.)

So, to put all this differently, whenever you find yourself considering something that seems completely impossible, but you just know you can do it, remember this: 1) you're completely right, 2) all you have to do is to break it down into manageable steps, and 3) keep trying. 

Happy Friday,
Teflon

1 comment:

  1. Tef, I think there's a corollary (or maybe just a small variation): when you think, "I've tried EVERYthing!", you're wrong.

    ReplyDelete

Read, smile, think and post a message to let us know how this article inspired you...