Saturday, September 4, 2010

It Gets Easier

In about twenty minutes, I'm heading down to Mom's Kitchen in South Egremont to meet Iris for breakfast. This morning, she popped out of bed, donned her running shoes and told me that she'd meet me there.

Mom's is a bit over four miles from our house. A few months ago, Iris would have thought long and hard about whether or not running to Mom's was a good idea. It would have seemed quite far away, perhaps impossibly far away. It would have taken a while to reach her decision and then twenty minutes to prepare. Today, her only hesitation was the consideration that four-miles just wasn't great enough distance to qualify for a run. With her regular runs of nine miles or more, Iris has reached the point where a half-marathon feels easily doable, a full marathon reasonably attainable, and four miles hardly worth considering. Running, which started as impossible, has become easy.

As I considered this, I realized that the transformation from impossible to easy is quite common place. We learn to walk. We learn to speak. We learn to drive cars. We learn to read books. Many activities that seem impossible at first become ones that we take for granted. And yet, we never seem to learn. When faced with a new challenge that we can't immediately see a way through, we think, "Oh my gosh, how am I ever going to do this?"

We fret. We dispair. We give up. We can't imagine it being doable at all, let alone easy. So, we believe the worst. And yet, were we to simply face the challenge, dropping all thoughts of impossible, difficult or burdensome, the challenge would eventually melt away and become easy.

So, I was thinking that if you were going to impart one bit of learning on your child today, it would be this: it gets easier. No matter how challenging something may appear. No matter how impossible it may feel. It gets easier. Sometimes it gets so easy that you can't imagine it being hard.

Happy Saturday,
Teflon

5 comments:

  1. Loved your insights.

    When I was a kid, singing in the children's chorus for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, we were not allowed music - everything had to be memorized. At first, memorizing works like Mahler's Eighth Symphony, was incredibly daunting. But, with time, I knew that we would have it down cold. I still have Mahler's Eighth (and many other pieces) memorized to this day, over thirty years later.

    I can do anything I set my mind to do.

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  2. Yep.....all about the quality of self-talk, we give ourselves.....if one truly wants....whatever....be the creator, as gifted talent wise? bw
    Thanks again for an awesome morning stimulation.....hugs!

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  3. I looove this! Thank you T! now, here is a link for you to share with iris, from me! This is WHAT I am talking about!! This is what I want!
    http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=148294495193152&saved

    xo -Erin Paradise-

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  4. Tef, you wrote "So, I was thinking that if you were going to impart one bit of learning on your child today, it would be this: it gets easier."

    Done. My 8-yr old got it today. An hour after reading this, he was taking a shower (only a few months ago, water falling on his head would be unthinkable), and he turned to me with a big smile and said "Look Dad, it gets easier!"

    A big Thank You, Tef; please keep these great lessons coming.
    sree

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  5. A useful belief-choice, for everyone to consider ;) bw

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